Thank You

Warm thanks to all who have read and left such passionate and insightful comments to these articles.  This website has been a project of mine through the phase of early motherhood.  Now that my children are getting older I am fortunate to be able to resume my former career in film and television, and communicate to an even broader audience through those media.  I will not be adding new articles to this blog, but will leave this modest collection for you to read and to provoke thought.  Mommy Myth Buster has been a forum through which I have presented uncommon perspectives on common parenting topics.  Although not everyone agrees with the ideas presented here, I feel the value lies in expanding our conceptions about what is “true”, inspiring dialog, and empowering parents to think critically about sound bytes that are presented as “facts”.  I feel articles in this blog have done that.  I would love to stay in touch with those of you who are also involved in media.  Please stop by the website for our film and video production company, Kids Creek Productions www.kidscreekproductions.com, if you have ideas to share in the realm of entertainment.

I wish your family health and happiness.

Angeline Duran Piotrowski

Myth 35: There are different “learning styles”.

We’ve all grown up being told that we learn better in different ways: some by doing, some by seeing, some by hearing…  This notion supported by the very real feeling that we do, in fact, absorb information better in some learning environments than in others.  Well, the Association for Psychological Science now says that learning styles are all a bunch of hooey.  They have reviewed all recognized studies that claim that a “visual learner” or an “auditory learner” exists, and have concluded that those studies “have not used the type of randomized research designs that would make their findings credible.”  That being said, it is still entirely possible that “learning styles” actually do exist, but basically what APS has declared is that nobody has ever sufficiently proven it. Continue reading

Myth 34: All Hand Sanitizers Sanitize

The great savior of germ conscious parents far and wide is the gel based hand sanitizer.  Pocket size bottles of it emerge from diaper bags and purses after potentially infectious encounters with playgrounds, before eating in public restaurants, and even discreetly after playdates with friends who have suspiciously runny noses.  Applying the astringent makes us feel in control, but are we being effective? The quick and dirty answer is Yes and No. Continue reading

Myths & Facts About Children’s Eye Health

10-16eyehealthMany parents grew up with medical adages or advice that have since been proven by scientists to be incorrect or outdated. Here are five common myths about children’s eye health and the medical reality behind them, written by the physicians at The Vision Center at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles. Continue reading

Myth 33: Early Daycare Prevents Allergy & Asthma Later

9-11daycare[Written by American Thoracic Society]

New research hints that the common belief that kids who go to daycare have lower rates of asthma and allergy later in life might be nothing more than wishful thinking. While young children in daycare definitely do get more illnesses and experience more respiratory symptoms as a result, any perceived protection these exposures afford against asthma and allergy seem to disappear by the time the child hits the age of eight. Continue reading

Myth 32: There’s Something Wrong With A Bedwetter

7-31toiletOnce our children outgrow diapers, we all hope that they will enjoy comfortable nights of sleep in a dry bed.  Also, more practically, we want them to be able to sleep over at friends’ houses or in a hotel bed without worry that they will soil the bed or suffer embarrassment.  But what about the child who, despite diligent night-training, continues to sleep right through the urge to use the bathroom. Is it his fault? Is it ours? Continue reading

Myth 31: All Anesthetics During Birth Harm Babies’ Brains

Anesthesia

No less a revered medical institution than the Mayo Clinic, the saviors of severely medically challenged children nationwide, have studied and declared that anesthetics used during cesarean births do not cause children to have brain problems. Continue reading

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